martin kaulen



By sound
Birdscapes
Les chutes du temps
Geomancia
Palíndromos
Arbórea
Bambusoideae
Paisaje microscópico
Cool coco gallery
Drone

CV
Contact
Texts

Paisaje microscópico, 2013
VII Festival Internacional de Arte Sonoro Tsonami, group show
Sala Puntángeles
Valparaíso, Chile
Paisaje microscópico, 2013. Interactive installation. Electronic microscope, seawater, amplifier, contact microphones, sound effect, wood, sand, stone, acrylic, projector. Dimensions variable
In Paisaje microscópico (Microscopic landscape), a sample of seawater taken from the port of Valparaiso, Chile, is analyzed in real time by an electronic microscope, allowing us to watch the behavior of small forms of life that move in the water environment. The sample is intervened by sound, which is amplified under the microscope, coming from the live recording of the interaction of spectators with a platform filled with sand and stones.

This work seeks to intuitively approach scientific and artistic research, inviting the viewer to participate in a transmedia experiment. The sound of the action on the platform is used as the mechanical force that moves the water in the microscope, establishing a communication between our scale of observation and the microscopic, thus evidencing the invisible relationships that occur in our environment and that are imperceptible to the naked eye.

Paisaje microscópico, 2013
Seawater sample from the port of Valparaíso, Chile
View of the seawater sample under the microscope
View of the seawater sample under the microscope

In Microscopic Landscape, Kaulen draws a connection between that which is imperceptible to our own eye to our actions. In this artwork, we are as much the subject of the artistic experience as we are the experiment itself, particularly when we try to reconnect to the microscopic universe. Sound is used as a tool to introduce changes and to create a new balance into the sample of seawater that shows the microscope, being a powerful communication tool to establish a link between what we can see and what we can't. And as our Interaction with the artwork changes the intensity of the sound, so is the sound transformed into the movement of the creatures living in the water. This enables direct visualization of the impact of our actions and at the same time, an inter-species and inter-worlds communication without leaving Earth, venturing into the depths of a universe often unknown to us.

Ljiljana Fruk, 2014 (Full text)